Deutsche Orden der Harugari
Ritual for the Subordinate Lodges (Initiation)


n.d
.


Opening

O.B.: Brothers, please come to order.
Gives one rap with the gavel.

Officers, please take your places.
Inner Guard, ascertain if the outer guard be present, and, if so, please close the door.
Brother Warden, examine the brothers present, ascertain if each have the pass word, and inform me of those without it.
The Warden asks each brother present to give him the pass word.
Warden:
 Brother O.B., the brothers are all correct.
One rap, the officers rise.
O.B.:
 Brother U.B., what are your duties in the lodge?
U.B.:
 To assist you in fulfilling the duties of your office, in case of absence to take your place, if there be no Ex B. present, and to uphold the laws of the order.
O.B.:
 Brother U.B., examine your right hand and your left hand assistants.
U.B.:
 Brother R.H. Assistant, what are your duties in the lodge?
R.H.A. of the U.B.:
 To see to it that the brothers give the signs correctly, and to assist in the initiation of new members.
U.B.:
 Brother L.H. Assistant, what are your duties in the lodge?
L.H.A. of the U.B.:
 To act in conjunction with your R.H.A., and in his absence to take his place.
U.B.:
 Brother O.B., my officers are familiar with their duties in the lodge.
O.B.:
 Brother Inner Guard, allow the brother Outer Guard to enter, and take his place.
Brother Outer Guard, what are your duties in the lodge?
O.G.:
 To observe carefully that no stranger listens, to respond to the sign for admission, when a brother desires to enter the lodge, and to see that the brothers are clothed in their proper regalia.
O.B.:
 Brother O.G., you may take your place, and allow brother I.G. to enter.
Brother I.G., what are your duties in the lodge?
I.G.:
 To receive the pass word, and in the absence of the O.G., to take his place.
O.B.:
 Brother Warden, what are your duties in the lodge?
Warden:
 To examine the brothers carefully, before the opening of the lodge, to inform you of all who have not the pass word, and to place the regalia in the place designated for them.
O.B.:
 Brothers Secretary, what are your duties in the lodge?
Secretary:
 To keep a complete and impartial record of the transactions of the lodge.
O.B.:
 Brother Financial Secretary, what are your duties in the lodge?
Financial Secretary: To keep an accurate account as between the members and the lodge, to receive all moneys due the lodge, and, upon receiving his receipt, to deliver the same to the treasurer.
O.B.:
 Brother R.H.A., what are your duties in the lodge?
R.H.A. of the O.B.:
 To assist you in the proper execution of the prescribed laws, and on my own part to open and close the lodge in due form.
O.B.:
 Brother L.H.A., what are your duties in the lodge?
L.H.A. of the O.B.:
 To observe that the brothers give the sign of salutation, to assist in the initiation of new members, and in the absence of your R.H.A. to take his place.
O.B.:
 Officers and Brothers: I hope and expect that each officer will perform his duty, that the brothers will conduct themselves orderly during the transaction of the business of this lodge, that each brother will look upon the lodge as his family, upon which our prosperity and our contentment depend. It is the duty of the O.B. not to permit any brother who has not the term pass word to enter, unless he be a member of this lodge.
It is the unremitting duty of the O.B. in all transactions of the lodge to act impartially and without prejudice, and to uphold the laws of the order.
I request the brothers to rise, and to assist my R.H.A. in the opening of the lodge.
Gives two raps with the gavel.
R.H.A.:
 At the request of our brother O.B., I declare this lodge to be now open in due form, and only such business may be transacted as shall tend to promote Friendship, Love and Humanity.
O.B.:
 Brothers, during the sitting of the lodge no debate is permitted concerning religion, or politics, in order that it may not become our painful duty to apply fines and strict laws.
I hereby declare the lodge to be open in due form.
The O.B. and the U.B. give alternately one rap, and the O.B. another rap which calls the lodge to order.

Preparatory Formula of the Ex B.
 
To be used in the initiation of Candidates.
An Ex B., nominated by the O.B. for the occasion, accompanied by the secretary, retires to the ante-room, and presents the following questions to the candidates.
1. What is your name?
2. Where do you live?
3. How old are you?
4. What is your business?
5. Are you both mentally and physically sound?
6. Were you ever proposed as a member of any lodge of the D.O.H.?
7. Have you read the constitution and the by-laws and are you willing to abide by them?
8. Do you promise to keep locked within your bosom as a holy secret all that may take place during your initiation?
9. Do you hereby agree to waive all claim to death and sick benefits if your dues, assessments, and taxes are not paid at the legally appointed time?
10. Are you willing to take a vow which does not conflict either your religious or your political convictions?
After the candidate has answered these questions satisfactorily, he must sign his name in the book kept for that purpose, and the Ex B. must add thereto:— initiated by Ex B. ….

Initiation
 
After the Ex B. has prepared the candidates, he leads them to the inner door and gives the usual sign of admission.
I.G.:
 Who seeks admission?
Ex B.:
 A brother with candidates who wish to be initiated into the secrets of our beloved order.
The I.G. repeats the above to the U.B. who says:
U.B.:
 You may admit them.
After the Ex B. has entered with the candidates, he leads them to the centre of the lodge room, and turns them over to the Guide, who addresses them as follows: 
Halt! We are not surprised to see you cross the threshold of our sanctuary, because we have been informed of your appearance here to-day, but before you go farther, at the command of my brother, I must advise you of the importance and magnitude of the step you are about to take, and to remind you that you are about to join an order whose object is both grand and noble, and one which it will become your duty as a member to help discharge.
It is the purpose of our order to preserve and foster the use of the German language wherever is may be, to give to German speaking citizens am opportunity to promote their spiritual and their material welfare, and to uplift and elevate their social conditions. This is accomplished by joining into individual bodies, called lodges, which are united by a common band, so that each member of the order may feel and know himself to be a brother of every other member, and one of a great whole.
Individually and together we walk by the side of the suffering and needy that we may carry into our daily life and practice, through charity and benevolence, the spirit of our order.
There is yet time for you to withdraw if you do not feel yourself resolute enough to meet the enactions which the fundamental principles of this order demand.
I ask of you, therefore, once again solemnly, do you wish to join our order? — Ans.
‘Tis well. You will not then hesitate to take a vow which shall not in any way interfere with your religious or political convictions, but which is, however, necessary to enjoy more fully the benefits of a secret order. Are you willing to take such a vow? — Ans.
Then follow me to our brother U.B.
The Guide conducts the brother to the chair of the U.B. and speaks:
Guide:
 Brother U.B., here is a friend of virtue and benevolence, who wishes to become a member of our beloved order, and is willing to place in your hands the oath of fidelity and secrecy.
U.B.:
 Is the faithful fulfilment of an oath or a vow a sacred matter to you? — Ans.
Then place your right hand over your heart, raise your left hand, and repeat after me:—
O.B. gives two raps.

I, …, in the presence of the brothers assembled, do most solemnly promise and vow that I will never communicate or betray in any manner to any one any of the secrets of the D O. H., which are now to be entrusted to me. That I will preserve outside of the lodge meeting an eternal silence concerning that which .1 here see and hear, that I will hold fast to the constitution, by-laws, rules and regulations of this lodge, and that I will obey all orders of the Grand Lodge of the State of Conn., of the United States, or of their officers.
To the faithful performance of all this I pledge my honor.
O.B. gives one rap.
U.B.:
 This oath, my friend, binds you to preserve the greatest secrecy, and to uphold the existing laws of this lodge. I will now have you conducted to our brother U.B., who will further instruct you.
Brother Guide, conduct our friend to our brother O.B.
O.B.:
 My friend, as you first crossed the threshold of our inner room it may be that the reception you received did not make on you that deep impression which you have expected on entering a secret order. But as pure and natural as are our principles, just to simple and unaffected are our forms, and since we deem you to be a man who values the principles and noble deeds of an order more than its forms, we hope in them at least to meet with your approval. Nevertheless, precaution and foresight compel us, in order that we may keep inactive and unworthy members from our midst, to have a preliminary examination precede the initiation of each brother, and to require of each an oath which because of its great significance shall bind him more closely and more intimately to us.
Be assured that you are now in the midst of a great order, which has in itself the inspiring consciousness that it is able to alleviate the sorrow and the pains of its members, and to promote the welfare of each.
Brother Guide, conduct the candidate to our brother Ex B.
The Guide conducts the candidate to the chair of the Ex B.
Ex B.:
 I greet you now cordially, and with my whole heart call you for the first time brother. You are now a member of a fraternal organization, whose members regard virtue as their principle of life, and seek by faithful, mutual fufillment to bestow on themselves all of the noble attributes which are associated with and spring from virtue, that they may attain the noblest purpose of mankind, that is to make others and themselves happy.
One of the noblest consequences of the practice of virtue is charity, and we have made it a fundamental rule for us in our order to practice charity; in fact, this should be the foundation stone of our order, and the pleasantest duty of the brothers. We wish to do good not only to the brothers of our lodge, but to those of the whole order, wherever it may be necessary. Only by mutual help in all conditions of life can happiness be ours, and when we die, we shall have the cheering hope that the tears of our widows and orphans, to whom we wish to be ever helping fathers and brothers, shall be dried and their pain and sorrow alleviated.
The needy and indigent shall ever find us true friends, and we shall try to the best of our ability to alleviate their misfortune. May slandered honor find consolation with us, and may misjudged right find in our love of justice the most complete reparation.
But to enjoy in full the blessings of our fraternity in our narrower circle, it should be our endeavor to treat with one another in truth, and with esteem and respect, in order that the constant unity and harmony of the lodge may not be disturbed, that our hearts may be attuned to peace and love, and that the strength may be given us to fulfill our duties the more energetically and easily.
Thus we fulfill the fundamental precepts of our order, for reciprocal equal rights beget friendship, and benevolence creates love, and our common struggle in life for these principles entitles us to the proud title of champions of humanity.
From these principles, my brother, you will perceive the grandeur and the loftiness of this order, and for your part be always gladly ready, by your deeds, to preserve for it the honor and the glory which justly belong to it as a German order. Therefore, as often as your business permits, visit the lodge, and keep yourself both within and without the lodge a worthy member.
If you have true and reliable friends, get them to join us, but be nevertheless cautious, for it is better to be one of a small body of men of one mind than it is to be one of a large body upon which discord and anarchy have laid the gnawing tooth of ruin.
Brother Guide, conduct the brothers to our secretary that he may sign the constitution and by-laws, and then again to our brother O.B.
When the former is done, the Guide accompanies him to the O.B.
O.B.:
 Dear Brother, I am pleased to see in you a member of our organization, which has at all times, because of its lofty principles, enjoyed the respect and the love of all the noble and the good. The earliest history of the primitive German race is also the history of the origin of the order, a history in which the many noble attributes of our ancestors above all the peoples of the earth are so gloriously called to mind. It was chiefly into the hands of the order of the Harugari, the priests of the ancient Germans, that the political and the religious guidance of the German races was trustfully put. With real German sense, with honest true heart it cared for the well-being of the people, and fought with intrepid courage for their natural rights and liberties.
It is to its influence that it is to be attributed that German faithfulness and German honesty became in later years proverbial, and were glorified as the splendid attributes of our race. But history tells us also of the terrible and devastating wars between the Romans and the Germans, of the mighty migrations of the peoples with their gigantic battles of annihilation, and of the rushing in of revolutions in all spheres of political and mental life, under the mighty influence of which the activity of the Harugari was shattered.
To the spirit of the new age, which filed the nineteenth century with its all powerful ardent desire for unity among all the descendants of the German races all over the earth, it was reserved to erect a new temple, which should have as its foundation pillars, together with the acquisition of one thousand years of civilization, the virtues of our forefathers as they were practiced and taught by the Harugari in the deep shadows of the forests of oak: German faith, German honesty, German sincerity.
This temple is the “Deutsche Order der Harugari," a fraternity which is intended to effect and uphold the community of the German sons of all races and in all places, and their affiliations with themselves and their fatherland everywhere and at all times.
You are now a member of the same. Work with us zealously, faithfully and honestly, and everywhere show yourself to be a real representative of human right, a protector of virtue, a comforter in sorrow. a true German man, in general, as a worthy brother of the Deutscher
Order der Harugari.
I will now continue to instruct you in the secrets of our order, Which consist of six signs, namely:
A sign of admission,
A pass word,
A sign of salutation,
A sign of voting,
A sign of recognition, and
A grip.
If you wish to visit a lodge of this order you will find the lodge room closed by two doors; in order to reach the inner door, knock, with, closed hand, … times on the outer door. The Outer Guard will respond with the same sign and open a slide in the door, in order to receive from you the term pass word, which I will give you later.
By repeating the first part or half of this word you will gain admission to the ante-room, clothe yourself with your proper regalia, and go to the inner door, on which you will knock … times.
You will be admitted to the lodge in giving the complete pass word and your name. If you are visiting another lodge of the order, you must give the inner guard, beside your name, the number and name of this lodge.
Then pass to the centre of the lodge room and make the following sign. Please give the sign after me. This sign of salutation you will first give to the O.B., whom you will find in every lodge of this order clothed in black regalia, then face about and give the same sign to the U.B., who is clothed in red regalia.
The sign of voting is as follows: …. Like all the brothers you will give this sign when voting on any question.
The sign of recognition is as follows: …. You may use this sign very cautiously outside of the lodge in social intercourse to ascertain if brothers of this order are present, who must give the following sign to prove to you that they are brothers of your order.
The O.B. gives the sign.

Brother Guide, give our brother the grip.
After the Guide has given the candidate the grip the O.B. continues: 
Conduct this brother to the ante-room and clothe him with the regalia proper to him.
The Guide conducts the brother again into the room, gives the sign of salutation with him, and brings him to the O.B., who gives him the pass word, presents him a constitution of the lodge, and requests the Guide to introduce this brother to the lodge, whereby he gives the sign to rise. After the introduction the O.B. gives one rap. This closes the initiation.

Closing of the Lodge
 
The O.B. gives one rap, the officers rise.
O.B.:
 Brother U.B., what is your last duty in the lodge?
U.B.:
 To thank the brothers for their attendance in the lodge, and to request them all to appear in the next meeting.
O.B.:
 Brother Warden, what are your last duties in the lodge?
Warden:
 To collect the regalia and other properties of the lodge and have careful charge over them.
O.B.:
 Inner Guard, what is your last duty in the lodge?
I.G.:
 To open the door and allow the brothers to depart in peace.
O.B.:
 I request the brothers to rise and give their attention to my R.H.A.
The O.B. gives two raps, the sign to rise.
R.H.A. of the O.B.:
 At the request of our brother O.B., I herewith declare this lodge adjourned in due form until the next meeting at … o’clock.
O.B.:
 I declare this lodge adjourned in due form.
The O.B. and the U.B. give alternately two raps.

Deutsche Orden der Harugari
Ritual of the First Degree


n.d.


The Secretary and the Guide retire to the ante-room. The former reads the list of applicants, and the latter examines them as to the pass word and signs, of the subordinate lodges, conducts them to the inner door, and gives the sign of admission.
Inner Guard:
 Who knocks?
Guide:
 A brother with … brothers, who wish to be initiated into the secrets of the first degree.
I.G. reports the same to the U.B.
U.B.:
 Allow them to enter.
On arriving in the lodge room the Guide places himself in front of the chair of the U.B. and says:
Guide:
 Brother U.B., I hereby present to you … brother who wish to be initiated in the secrets of the first degree.
U.B.:
 Who guarantees that the brothers are worthy of being initiated into such secrets?
Guide:
 A brother who has examined the recommendations of their respective lodges, and can himself recommend them.
U.B.:
 If this be so, then, brothers, prepare yourselves, place your right hands over your hearts, raise your left hands, and repeat after me.
The O.B. gives two raps, the sign to rise.

I, …, in the presence of the assembled brothers, do promise and vow, that I will keep locked within my bosom as a holy secret, the secrets, signs and pass words which shall to-day be entrusted to me, that as long as I live I will never communicate or betray to any one not a brother of the first degree of the Deutschen Orden der Harugari any part thereof. Furthermore I promise to obey the regulations of the Grand Lodge and of the officers of our order. Should I fail to keep this, my promise, may severe punishment and ignomity befall me.
The O. B. gives one rap.
U.B.:
 The vow which you have just taken entitles you to be informed of all of the secrets and signs of this degree.
Brother Guide, conduct the brothers to the chair of the Ex B. who will acquaint them with the principles which govern the action of the brothers of the first degree.
Ex B.:
 Brothers, our order is founded on Friendship, Love, and Humanity. Friendship makes of us true brothers, Love teaches us to relieve a needy brother with joy, and Humanity teaches us to see in the unfortunate and the suffering in general an object for the exercise of sympathy and practical care, for it imposes on us the duties of helping the unfortunate and of sharing his burden in order to lighten it and to give to his anxious mind the much needed peace. But in doing so we must ever be led by Truth. Truth is a noble attribute and the foundation of every virtue. If we are devoted to truth, deceit and hypocrisy will disappear, and candor and sincerity will characterize us, and everything will unite to promote a brother’s welfare and to cause us to rejoice in his good fortune. Hereto, dear brothers, we need the following four cardinal virtues, Moderation, Resolution. Wisdom, and Justice.
By moderation we understand the proper control of our desires and passions, that the body and the soul may not be conquered by the temptation of vice. This virtue should be practiced by every brother of our order.
He will be taught thereby to avoid excesses, and dissolute and vicious habits, by which he might be beguiled into betraying to one not initiated some or all of the precious secrets which he promised to keep secret, which betrayal would bring down upon him the contempt and the detestation of all the brothers of the order.
Resolution is that noble and steadfast character of the mind which enables us to endure hardships, pain and danger. It is equally removed from foolhardiness and cowardice, and joined with moderation should be sacred to every brother as a support against inconstancy and timidity, as well as against every unlawful attempt which may be made forcibly or otherwise to learn the precious secrets so solemnly entrusted to him.
Wisdom teaches us to regulate our life and our action according to the dictates or reason, and is that attribute of the mind which enables us to judge of these things which our present and future welfare demand, with deliberation and understanding.
This virtue should belong to every brother in order that he may regulate his conduct within and without the lodge according thereto. It should be especially observed in all strange and mixed gatherings, that not a sign, grip or pass word be imprudently given, whereby the secrets of our order might be betrayed.
Justice we possess if we allow everyone without distinction to obtain that which belongs to him. This virtue is enjoined us by natural and human laws, and is the tie and the prop of human society.
Since Justice characterizes to a great degree the good man, it should be the constant effort of every brother, even in the most insignificant affairs never to be untrue to it.
Brother Guide, kindly conduct the brothers to our brother O.B.
Guide:
 Brother O.B., I present to you the brothers who have taken the oath and have learned of the principles of the first degree, that you may further instruct them.
O.B.:
 It is now my duty to ask you if you are willing to take these principles you have just heard as rules of conduct?
Candidates:
 Yes.
O.B.:
 Since you have answered the question affirmatively, it is now my duty to instruct you in all the secrets of this degree.
O.B.:
 Brothers, we have in this degree a sign of admission, a pass word, a sign of salutation.
The O.B. explains the sign.

The color of this degree is yellow, that of gold, one of the noble metals.
The symbol of this degree is the beehive.
It symbolizes industry and commends the practice of this virtue to all creatures, the high and the low, the rich and the poor. It teaches us that we, as being endowed with discernment and reason, should be also active and industrious, and never to be idle or happy so long as a brother languishes in misery if it be in our power to prevent.
If we behold man in his infancy we find him more helpless and needy than the beast; in the first years of his life he is unable to support, defend or protect himself. Man could have been created to be independent of all other creatures, but, since dependence is the strongest social band, he was created to be mutually dependent, that thereby he might have a better opportunity to fulfill the duties of mutual love and friendship. Man, the noblest creature on earth, was created for social and active life, and he who so far degrades himself that he does not perform his share for the good of the great whole is n drone, a useless member of human society and unworthy of our protection as a member of this order.
Finally, my brothers, be faithful and prove by your future conduct that you were worthy of being entrusted with the secrets just imparted you.
Please be seated.
The O. B. with the usual sign hereupon declares the lodge closed in the first degree, and permits the brothers who wish to receive the second degree to retire.

Deutsche Orden der Harugari
Ritual of the Second Degree


n.d.


The Guide retires and examines the candidates as to the pass word of the first degree, conducts them to the inner door and gives two raps.
I.G.:
 Who knocks?
Guide:
 A brother with brothers of the order who wish to be initiated into the secrets of the second degree.
Inner Guard reports the same to the U.B.
U.B.:
 Permit them to enter.
On arriving in the lodge room the Guide places himself in front of the chair of the U.B. and says:
Guide:
 Brother U.B., I hereby present to you … brothers, who wish to be initiated into the secrets of the second degree.
U.B.:
 Who guarantees that these brothers are worthy of being initiated into such secrets?
Guide:
 A brother who has examined the recommendations from their respective lodges, and can recommend them himself.
U.B.:
 If this be so, prepare yourselves, place your right hand over your heart, raise your left hand, and repeat after me.
The O.B. gives the sign to rise.

I, …, in the presence of the brothers present, do hereby promise and vow, that I will keep locked in my breast as a holy secret the secrets, signs, grip and pass word which shall be here to-day entrusted to me, that as long as I live I will never communicate or betray any part thereof to anyone not a member of the second degree of the Deutschen Orden der Harugari.
Should I ever violate this, my promise, may the disgrace of expulsion and the contempt of all the brothers befall me.
The O.B. gives one rap.
U.B.:
 The vow which you have just taken entitles you to be informed of all the secrets and signs of the second degree. But before this shall take place, I must send you to our brother Ex B., who will inform you of the principles by which the brothers of the second degree should be governed.
Brother Guide, conduct the brothers to the chair of the Ex B.
Ex B.:
 The principles, which are impressed upon us in this degree, are especially qualified to ennoble our hearts, even to win over that of the roughest man to friendship and virtue, and to kindle and to call into activity the tenderest feelings of human love. If any association among mankind is able to raise and ennoble the soul and the heart, and to bring man again nearer to
nature and innocence; if any institution is entirely devoted to awakening the power of investigation, the love of truth, and sincerity in thought, to inflame man to love of mankind, to make him virtuous, generous and gentle, to kindle in him feelings of friendship and brotherly love, of patience and peaceableness, to link him in the closest bond for the promotion of happiness, to vouchsafe him pure, wise. and peaceable friends, to help him forget during the happy hours of closer union the burdens of life and at other time to lighten them, it is our order,
and so may it ever be. Herein consists its spirit and its life, its grandeur and its worth. The lodge meetings should be considered sanctuaries of peace and order.
Our order is a German order; the maintenance of the German language and good German customs lie therefore near to our hearts. It is a fraternal order. “Friendship, love and humanity," is its motto.
To rise to the highest perfection is our aim. Our purpose is social virtue, i. e., to make human happiness more common.
Human happiness consists in freedom. The chains which oppress mankind are its prejudices. And is it beyond human strength that men, raised above all illusions, circumstances, time, opinion, and prejudice, should come together to make purely conspicuous the nature of virtue, and that they in order to make the noble chain indissoluble, should bind themselves with an oath to remain true to their principles, and finally to make them general?
Surely, dear brothers, if we follow all of the principles of our order we shall certainly contribute our mite to the realization of this noble thought.
Brother Guide, please conduct the brothers to our brother O.B., that they may be more deeply initiated into the secrets of the second degree.
Guide:
 Brother O.B., I hereby present to you the brothers who have taken the oath and have been informed of the principles of the second degree that you may further instruct them.
O.B.:
 Dear brothers, you have been informed by our brother Ex B. of the principles of the second degree, it is my duty to inform you of the pass word and all other signs and symbols of this degree.
Brothers, we have in this degree:
A sign of admission
A pass word.
A sign of salutation,
Two symbols.
The O.B. here explains the signs.

The color of this degree is red.
The anchor and the ark are symbols of a well founded hope. and a well used life. They symbolize that ark, which conducts us safely through this stormy life, and anchor which holds us fast in a peaceful harbor, whither the wicked do not pursue us, and the weary find rest.
This degree is of such great importance because two brothers of the order having this degree rendered much services to the German people in the most remote antiquity. The history of our people tells us their names and places these by the side of those of the greatest heroes, Loki and Baldur. Long before the time of Hermann, the Cherusker prince, there ruled tyrannically in the German provinces Walliroth, who by deceit and intrigue succeeded in winning over one tribe after another.
After he had subdued them all, he showed his faithless and unworthy character by gradually robbing the tribes under his rule of their liberties more and more, instead of making them contented. How can one then wonder that the brothers of our order felt the deepest sorrow at the decline of the fatherland, and that they thought night and day of means and ways to put a check on the ruinous efforts of the tyrant. Two brothers of the order having the second degree, Loki and Baldur, lamented with one another the disgrace which rested on the German provinces, and each swore to himself to put an end to this disgrace.
One of them disclosed his plan to the other. Both plans were alike, namely, to drive a dagger into the tyrant’s breast. There arose a noble rivalry between them, because each wished the honor and glory of having accomplished the noble deed, so that chance had to decide.
It decided for Loki. Loki set out now for the palace of the tyrant, in order to perform his holy deed. He stepped before the tyrant, who by accident discovered the dagger under Loki’s raiment. Thereupon the tyrant called in his bailiff’s and ordered them to chain Loki. This done he ordered them to depart. Then he asked the chained Loki: “What did you intend to do with the dagger?" Loki’s answer was short. “To drive it into thy tyrannical breast and with one blow free the fatherland of its oppressor."
The tyrant answered sneeringly: “You shall repent of this in the deepest prison, and pay with your life therefore." After the bailiffs were recalled,, Loki was reformed to the deepest part of the prison. He notified then his friend Baldur of all that had happened and begged him to come to him, as he wished to give him several commissions to perform for his family. As soon as Baldur received word from his friend he hastened to seek out Walliroth in his palace and to request of him to be placed as a hostage for his friend Loki, that he might have the opportunity to arrange his household affairs himself, care for his family and take a last farewell.
The tyrant granted Baldur’s request with the condition that if his friend Loki did not return at the fixed time, he must suffer death for him. Baldur now visited his friend Loki in prison and acquainted him with all he had procured for him from the tyrant. Loki embraced his brother, thanked him for the proofs of his friendship and love, departed and promised to be back at the fixed time.
The minutes, hours, and days passed; but no Loki appeared. The tyrant Walliroth, for whom it was a pleasure to sneer at the friends because of the love and friendship they had shown each other, called to Baldur as he was on the way to the place of execution: “How beautiful your faith in your friend has proven itself to be! Do you still believe in true Friendship, Love and Fidelity?"
Baldur answered, “Tyrant, my friend will surely yet appear, and even if I should fall a sacrifice because of his non-appearance, I shall still preserve my belief in the faithfulness of my friend, for only insurmountable obstacles would keep him away so long."
Meantime they arrived at the place of execution, the last minute had almost arrived in which the handsome young man was to be transported from life to death. The eyes of the surging crowd were turned on him, who; full of peaceful resignation, with a serene, glorified countenance turned his eyes toward Heaven. The tyrant was just about to give the death signal, when from a distance there squealed Hold! Hold! Hold! The sound came nearer and nearer, and Loki forced his way through the crowd and up to his friend, and into his friend’s arms.
At this sight no eye remained dry: even the tyrant could not resist. With generous emotion he stepped up to the two friends, gave Loki his life and liberty and begged them to admit him to their holy order.
The later history tells us that Walliroth restored to the German people the liberty of which they had been robbed, and that he became one of the noblest princes, and one of the most distinguished brothers of the order.
Brothers’ in this our ancestors have given us a precedent, which shows so clearly the sublimity of true friendship, and should serve as an example for every brother; for with such a mutual confidence we can attain the goal for which we are striving.
Dear Brothers, since you are now initiated into the secrets of the second degree, we wish you good fortune. The inner, not the outer, characteristics commed the brother. Just as you increase your knowledge, just so will you become better by intercourse with good men.
It is unnecessary to repeat to you the duties, which you as brothers of the order are bound to fulfill. You must conscientiously obey our rules and laws and constantly see to it that others do so.
Your former conduct and good behavior have won for you the privilege and the honor of becoming a participant in all the secrets of this degree, and we expect that you in your new character, as brothers of the second degree, will conduct yourselves strictly according to its demands, and that you will constantly strive for that which is honorable and praiseworthy. This, dear brothers, is your duty, and hereto you have bound yourselves by a solemn vow.
Please take your place now.
The O.B. closes the degree lodge in the second degree, has the brothers examined for the pass word of the third degree, and any further business is transacted in the third degree.

Deutsche Orden der Harugari
Ritual of the Third Degree


n.d.


Opening

All business in a degree lodge must be conducted in the third degree except the conferring of the, first and second degrees, whereby the lodge is closed in the third degree and simply opened in the first or second degree.
The O. B. gives one rap.
O.B.:
 I.G., please close the door. Brother Warden, examine those present and ascertain if they are brothers of the third degree, and if they have the pass word of the current term.
The warden examines the brothers present.
Warden:
 The brothers are all in order.
O.B.:
 Brother U.B., who are you?
U.B.:
 A brother of the third degree.
O.B.:
 Brother U.B., where do you keep the secrets of our order entrusted to you?
U.B.:
 In my heart.
O.B.:
 Is there a key thereto?
U.B.:
 Yes.
O.B.:
 Where do you keep it?
U.B.:
 In a casket of coral, which is opened and closed with keys of ivory.
O.B.:
 Of what metal is it made?
U.B.:
 Of none, it is the tongue, which obeys the understanding, and willingly speaks only good of those present as well as those absent.
O.B.:
 Brother U.B., I am satisfied with your knowledge and your sentiments. Notify the brothers that it is my wish and will to open the lodge in the third degree.
The O.B. gives the sign to rise.
O.B.:
 I hereby declare this lodge duly opened in the third degree.
I.G., please notify the O.G. that the lodge is open in the third degree.
The O. B. gives one rap.
After the business up to the conferring of the first or second degrees have been finished, the O.B. gives two raps, closes the third and opens the lodge in the degree which is to be conferred, and when the degree is conferred he opens the lodge again in the third degree, when all unfinished business is attended to.

The altar is draped in black, on the altar in front of the O.B. are the three symbols feebly illuminated.
The altar in front of the U.B. is also draped in black.
The Secretary and the Guide retire to the ante-room. The former reads the list of applicants, and the latter examines them as to the pass word and signs, of the subordinate lodge, and the pass word of the first two degrees, conducts them to the inner door, and gives two raps. After they have entered, the Guide leads them several times about the room while the three higher officers repeat the following successively:
U.B.:
 O Death, how bitter art thou, when he thinks of thee, whose days are happy, who has plenty and lives without care, and who prospers in all things!
O.B.:
 O Death, how welcome art thou to the needy one, who is now weak and old, who is oppressed by cares, and has nothing better to hope for or expect!
Ex B.:
 Fear not death, remember, that it is ordained of all flesh; of that which has gone before thee, and of that which shall follow thee.
The Guide goes with the candidates to the chair of the Ex B.
Ex B.:
 My brothers, have you considered carefully the teachings of the degrees you have already received, and are you willing to renew before the assembled brothers of the third degree the promises you have already made, and to make these stronger? If so, answer.
The candidates answer.
Ex B. to the Guide:
 Brother Guide, conduct the brothers to our brother U.B.
The Guide conducts them to the chair of the U.B.
U.B.:
 How far have you advanced in the D. O. H.?
Have you received the second degree? Answer.
U.B.:
 Lay your right hand over your heart, raise the left and repeat after me:
The O. B. gives the sign to rise.

I, …, hereby promise and vow, freely and unconstrainedly, in the presence of the assembled brothers, that I will keep locked in my breast as a holy secret all the signs and secrets of the Deutschen Orden der Harugari, which shall be entrusted to me to-day, or have been entrusted to me in the past, that I as long as I live will never communicate or betray to anyone not a member of the third degree D. O. H. any part thereof. Furthermore, I promise never to slander or speak malevolently of any brother of this order, either behind his back or in his presence, but I will rather warn him of any threatening danger if it be in my power to do so. At the same time I promise that I will obey all regulations of the order in this and the preceding degrees, and that I will aid and assist to the best of my ability, by word and deed, all brothers who are in want or needy circumstances, as well as their widows and orphans. To the fulfillment of all this I pledge my sacred honor.— But should I ever violate this my sacred vow, may dishonorable expulsion and the detestation of all the brothers befall me.
U.B.:
 Brother Guide, conduct the brothers to the altar.
The Guide conducts the brothers to the altar.
O.B.:
 Lay your right hand on your heart, and lay your left hand on the altar.
The O. B. gives two raps.
While this is going on, the brothers present approach and form a circle about the altar, while the O. B. says: 
Red as gladness, be the brothers token,
Pure as Gold, the spirit which inspires us,
And that e’en is death, we ne’er despair
Be black the ‘band that hangs about our breasts.

Though rock and oak may split
We ne’er shall tremble.
With stormy grief a brother is onward borne,
To battle and die for a brother’s weal.
The O. B. gives one rap.
The assisting officers take their places.
O.B. to the brothers in front of the altar:
 My brothers, you are welcome into the fraternity of the third degree. I have now the following to communicate to you:
As our never to be forgotten G.B., Wodan, long before the time of Hermann, was occupied with a plan to give to the order of the Harugari a more complete form, he invited six of the most distinguished brothers to a conference, in order to erect a structure which should defy time and for eternity operate for the good of the German people. For this purpose they separated those connected with them according to their capabilities into four classes: into the blue, the yellow, the red and the black. The order increased in numbers from year to year, Virtue and zeal for the same were the means of becoming participants of the higher degrees. Four brothers of the blue degree, who had been members from the founding of the order, through their own fault could not acquire a higher degree, and embittered thereby they swore to attack the G.B. hostilely and force from him the secret; of the higher degrees, and, if this should fail them, to kill him.
Therefore one morning early they lay in wait for the G.B., attacked him, bound him hand and foot, tortured him in the severest way to learn the secrets, and since he in spite of his pangs remained firm, they killed him, and buried his body under an oak.
In the evening after sunset the brothers of the order met; the accustomed hour at which the G.B. should appear passed. He came not. Thereupon a solemn stillness came upon the meeting, and the G.W. cried with loud voice: “Is there a brother present who can give information concerning our brother G.B.?"
No answer followed. The G. Warden continued: “Since undoubtedly some adverse fate has befallen our G.B., let us go out and see if we cannot get some information of him." All of the brothers of the third degree withdrew and with lights sought for their missing G.B.; suddenly they heard a terrible cry from a raven, which flew about an oak. They hurried to the oak, found the ground at its foot recently dug up. They removed the earth and in a short time found the body of the beloved G.B.
They wound the body of the G.B. most carefully in cloth, and betook themselves with it into the lodge to the brothers of the order. Anguish and sorrow seized all the brothers present. All with the exception of four were present. Some were sent out to call the four who were absent. They came, and, as they saw the mutilated body of the G.B., such a fear overpowered them, that they sank down and confessed to having murdered the G.B. The brothers, furious, called for vengeance, and
unanimously condemned the culprits to death. But the G.W. tried to calm the brothers, entreated them to be circumspect and lenient, and implored them not to stain their hands with blood.
Thereupon they determined unanimously to expel these four unworthy members, and to banish them beyond the border of their district. On the following day the body of the honored G.B. was solemnly consigned to earth by the brothers, and a young oak planted over his grave.
Brothers: This short story gives us an example of faithfulness and resolution, which deserves to be taken wholly to heart, and should be constantly before us as an example.
I will now inform you of the signs of the third degree.
They are as follows:
1. The sign of admission.
2. The pass word.
3. The sign of salutation.
4. The sign of recognition.
5. The sign of warning.
6. The sign of need, and the cry for help.
7. The grip.
8. Three symbols.
The O. B. explains the different signs to the brothers.

The color of this degree is black.
The three symbols, which you see here, represent the three main divisions of human life, youth, manhood, and old age, which we expound as follows:
In youth, that is, as brothers of the first degree, we should strive to enrich our minds with useful knowledge.
In manhood, as brothers of the second degree, we should utilize this knowledge in the fulfillment of our duties towards our neighbors and towards ourselves, and in old age, as brothers of the third degree, we should continue on the road without wavering and should be a light to those that are younger, in order that we may one day look back without internal reproaches on our well spent lives.
The symbol,

The Sword
pointed to a naked heart, represents that justice overtakes us sooner or later, and, even if our thoughts, words, and deeds can be kept hidden from man, yet that

All Seeing Eye
which sun, moon, and stars obey, perceives the most secret thoughts of the human heart, and will reward us according to our deeds. Youth should especially take this to heart, that it may early take the right road, sow good, and later reap blessings and benedictions.

The Hour Glass
is the symbol of human life. Behold how quickly the sand falls, and how quickly our life approaches its end. We cannot behold without marvel the little grain’s of sand, as they, hardly that we perceive them, fall and in the short space of an hour are spent. Thus does man also pass away; to-day there spring from him the tender leaves of hope; but on the morrow there comes a frost, which destroys the branch; or as he thinks that he is on the sure road to the greatest honor and power, he is suddenly mowed down like the grass, and falls like the leaves in winter to be mingled with mother earth.

Death With the Scythe
is a symbol of time which severs our thread of life and bears us into eternity. Behold, what ruin the scythe makes among mankind. If we happen to be spared the innumerable evils of life in our childhood and in our youth, and reach the years of manhood in good health, yet all too soon we are mowed down by the scythe of time and gathered into the land whither our ancestors have gone before us.
Herewith we close the explanation of the symbols.
My brothers, in virtue of the power vested in me I have accepted you as brothers of the third degree, and as a sign thereof I give you the badge of this degree.
The brothers clothe themselves with the regalia, and the O.B. continues:
O.B.:
 Your zeal for the D. O. H., the progress which you have made in the secrets of the same, and your determination to submit to our laws, have recommended you to us as brothers who deserve our respect and love, Duty, honor, and gratitude bind you to lock in your bosom as a holy secret, all that which was entrusted to you, to guard the worth of your character on every occasion, and by precept and example to obtain recognition for all demands of the order.
As brothers of the third degree it is your duty to correct the mistakes and errors of your less well instructed brothers, and to warn them when they are in danger of becoming faithless to their promises. To uphold the honor of the order must be your constant effort; and therefore you should recommend confidence and obedience to the brothers of lower degrees, show friendly behaviour toward those of the same degree, and courtesy and obedience to your superiors.
You should always enjoin universal charity, and by your conduct according to the principles of the order be the best example for others. May no earthly gain make you, my brothers, unfaithful to your duty; be faithful to your promises and your vows, and show by your commendable example that you were worthy of the honor we have just conferred upon you, and of the confidence we have reposed in you.
Herewith I declare you duly instructed and initiated into the secrets of the third degree.
You will now please take your places,
Any further business of the degree lodge will now be continued.

Closing

O.B.: Brother U.B., is it time to close the lodge?
U.B.:
 It is fully proper time.
O.B.:
 Brother U.B., request the brothers to assist me in closing the lodge.
U.B.:
 Brothers, it is the wish and will of our brother O.B., that you assist him in closing the lodge.
The O.B. gives the sign to rise.
O.B.:
 Brothers, may our band of brothers never be dissolved.
In the name of the high officers of our honorable order, and by virtue of the power conferred on me I declare this lodge to be closed in due form.
O.B. gives alternately with the U.B. two raps.